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Artists CV    artwork
Damjan Komel

Born 1971 in Šempeter near Nova Gorica, Slovenia. He finished School of Electrical engineering in Nova Gorica. Currently he is regularly employed at a gaming company in Nova Gorica. As he wished for a new challenge in life and, by coincidence, in 2001 his friend and painter Mr. Jurij Mikuletič put him in contact with the famous Slovenian sculptor Mr. Janez Pirnat. As a result, he took part in the workshop “Siparis”. Mr. Pirnat was his first tutor and mentor. He got so enthusiastic about stone that in 2001 he enrolled at the Famul Stuart School of applied Art in Ljubljana. After three years in private school and after work in studio on guidance of sculptor Ms.Gail Morris he is now showing the results and toil of his hard work. Over the last years he have taken part in group exhibitions in Slovenia, Italy, Austria and Croatia.

ARTWORK
Damjan Komel indicated the originality of the idea and of the skilful and witty formal solution in his work. The stylised forms in Carst stone and different marbles – combined with glass, bronze and gold, particularly in its »desk size« marks a cleaver slide from classic sculpture past craftsman to practical products of serial production. The author seems well aweare of this, yet with some distance and wit which only contributes to the quality of the sculpture. There is also a combination of traditional and eternalist sculptural materials (Karst stone, Marble) and quotidian additions: a cup, an apple, an inscription in gold,... It is clear that the author's intent is more than to accentuate the material aestetic appearance of the stone: by creating an opposition or even a contradiction between the stone mass, on the one hand, and human artefacts of everyday life and everyday desires, on the other, he creates a tension which simultaneously has an ironic, an inventive, and a profound effect – but in such a way that is avoids its decline into banality. The aim of art is not to objectify the haughty aims of high art but to register and imaginarely point out desires arising from our everyday life.